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of trade, as well. yes, an ipad in china gets made and it's value point $50. but it's only about $20 of that that goes to china and the rest goes back to the u.s. we'll get into the dynamics of trade, as well, and how we measure it. we'll also be joined by the ilo director general, as well, guy rider. we'll hear from the head of the world intellectual property organization. so it's a big trade day here from geneva on "worldwide exchange." lots of great things to get into. and by the way, 157 members of the wto, shortly to be 158. kazakhstan today should get the approval, all 157 ambassadors are here. they will get approval later this afternoon. so an ever expanding membership base. >> kazakhstan being just the latest. plenty more from ross straight ahead on the program. in the meantime, we want to check in our how markets are doing. so much attention on italy. in particular, you can see the message broadly speaking this morning is in negative, we're seeing about a four to one outpacing decliners versus vapsers here. the stoxx 600 is down abo about .37%. let's take a look across the t
. how we really globalize. globalization is a big company game. i can go to china and not be afraid. going to africa and compete with the chinese. i can go to russia and say i can manage the risk-reward equation. so that's where a lot of new consumers are and i would say that is a core competency of a multibusiness big company like g.e. so i'd say it's more than those two but those two are important. >> rose: you once said to me tell me what the global economy will look like and the domestic economy will look like and i can can tell you what g.e. will do. >> uh-huh. >> rose: look ahead to the global economy today and tell me how you see it, where it's going and pra what are the prospects for growth? >> i think the world always revolves around a couple fundamentals. one is where are the people? demographics rule. at times when the u.s. grew the fastest was times when the population was also growing the fastest. so the fact there that there's a billion new consumers joining the middle-class in the next five or ten years, you bet be with them. the second is the cost of materials so bas
are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south korea and even with the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening japan/ize lie yans is the first step toward rebuilding japan's diplomacy and security. >> abe promised the central government will take the lead in rebuilding disaster-hit regions in northeastern japan, especially fukushima prefecture, home to the damaged nuclear plant. the new prime minister says he will achieve results as soon as possible to redeem the trust of the japanese people. >>> prime minister abe's launched his cabinet tuesday after the top lawmakers elected him to the top job. both houses of parliament elected abe as prime minister, a post he held between 2006 and 2007. abe is the first politician in 64 years to return to the position after resigning. his liberal democrats ruled japan almost continuously for half a century. abe has spent the past week or so shaping his cabinet. he has filled it with some new faces and some familiar ones. y. shihide suga has taken on the job of cabinet secretary that makes him the head government spok
the bank of china to finance whatever part of the grant that was given to a123 batteries, we still have to pay that back. the taxpayers are still on the hook for baying back the deaf -- paying back the deficit-spending portion of that money even though it's now long, long gone. megyn: so we borrowed from china so that we could offer stimulus. we gave part of the stimulus to a123. a123 spent $100 million plus of the money, failed to succeed, and now that, those assets are going to china too. >> well, when you say it that way, megyn, you make it sound like it's not very much fun, i mean, my gosh. [laughter] megyn: china makes out well in this deal. i don't know about the american taxpayer though. >> they're doing pretty well in all of this. and the problem for the president today is his whole idea is i'm going to go to detroit and talk about how my economic strategy is working and that what we need to do is increase taxes on the top earners so that we can take that money and stimulate the economy. and as he says, invest in the middle class. and as he says, keep the tax rates down for thos
growth in the u.s. and that can become even stronger engines for both. china is slowing, europe is in recession. so the main concern -- and this is a risk scenario, what they call a left tail. it's not the baseline, is that we get a tipping process that one bad thing here leads to another bad thing elsewhere, which comes back here. and that's why the hope is somehow, somehow, i don't know how, but somehow in the next week washington will find a way to avoid this fiscal cliff. >> from your lips to god's ears, mohamed, thanks very much. coming up, as long as congress doesn't trip us up, we are on the way to an economic renaissance in this country. i'll explain. ally bank. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. >>> we are on the road to an economic renaissance. think about the united states econom
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
.n. security resolutions. he also talked about china's decision to the aircraft carrier in the obama administration shifted À la terry resources for the pacific region. this is a half-hour. >> well, good morning and allow hot. i am glad to be here to talk to you about the pacific command, where we are today to where we see ourselves heading in the future. since the last time i was here, we continue to move forward on the rebalanced initiative after as directed by president obama. the rebalanced rows on the strengths of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yeste
and a half percent per year, suddenly it started going up 3% a year as china and india really kicked in. other things being equal, if you change the rate of emission of co2 to the atmosphere, the so-called airborne fraction, the fraction of the co2 that appears in the atmosphere should increase, simply because that quick injection of co2 causes the ocean surface layers to be relatively saturated so it can't get in to the ocean as fast as it used to. but what's actually happened in the last 12 years is the airborne fraction has plummeted. it's now only about 40%. the other 60% is disappearing. and it's not mostly going in to the ocean. the good fraction of it is being taken up, somehow, by the terrestrial biosphere. and i think that's because of the -- we were doubling -- i think we're doubling down on the faustian bargain because we're fertilizing the terrestrial biosphere, both with the co2 in the atmosphere and the combination of that with more nitrogen which will spread in part of -- the nitrogen is being spread around by these aerosols which china and india are putting out and its a
also have an economic competitor and a partner in china. they have a voracious appetite for natural resources and we're looking at new ways to get these in our own backyard, and maybe i will ask you this question, admiral. how important is the china factor in america energy program's going forward? >> i will talk to doubt, but i would like to mention a few puffs things about this report that may not have come out in your opening remarks. we definitely advocating opening of drilling in the united states where we cannot, but there is a very strong part of this report that says it has to be done safely and we know how to do it safely. that is one contribution of those of us who have served in the armed forces, we do a lot of dangerous stuff in the armed forces, fuel, nuclear power, explosives. the way we do that safely is a high standards, rigid enforcement, and very professional inspectors to do it. we strongly recommend applying this model to regulatory body so that we can do this safely, so that we can do oil retractions safely. that we can do safely. the general and i live in penns
at the new leadership in china and think they will change the way china is -- >> well, there a new generation,i've met some of them. but the question -- i think they face enormous questions about their own internal political system i hope that there's a real international opportunity to nationalize their currency. instead of that being a threat it's an opportunity for london as a financial center to be the place where ewan trading takes place and, in fa the la cole o months r the first time in our history a chinese bank issues and rnb bond outside china and hong kong so that's because of a lot of hard work in the city of london and with the british government to make britain a place where this new activity takes place. it's a good example of us actually not do so powered by rolls royce engines and airbus planes. the that's a bit anglocentric but there are going to be oductsnd service which is people and theseountriesill want for the first time in their families histories and there's a real opportunity for western businesses. >> rose: the larger middle-class, the emerging nations for anybody w
some money to fix it. >> number five, china. is china slowing or is china leading the world? we do know that china will be the biggest economy in the world by 2020, for sure by 2030. >> china. >> china. >> china. >> china. >> china. >> china also getting more than a few mentions during the presidential campaign, probably because it's pretty clear that china is both a competitor and a partner. >> number four, europe. the european union was fractured by too much debt and the austerity plans to fix it. that saga is far from over. number three, the housing market. finally, finally bottomed out. the combination of low home prices and continued record low mortgage rates set off a building and buying spree. well-healed investors began buying entire neighborhoods, but first-time buyers were also able to get a home of their own for the first time in years. as long as they had a hefty down payment. >> number two. cnn projects that barack obama will be re-elected president of the united states. >> the election. more than just about obama and romney, it was about socialism and capitalism, about spe
that that causes, particularly in an era where rising demand for petroleum in china and india and elsewhere is creating potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize that transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum where the prices are set on the world market. canada and norway have been net petroleum exporters, but they pay in those countries the same market price for a gallon of gasoline as we do. so you must diversify, and that includes electrification of short-haul transportation, light-duty trucks and vehicles, and the adoption of natural gas either in its lick if i quide or compressed forms for heavy-duty vehicles and over the road vehicles. but taken as a whole if the recommendations of the eslc are adopted, the united states has the potential to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum and thereby reduce our national security risk to improve our balance of payments and about half of our balance of payments deficit remains petroleum, and to increase our g.d.p. by the maximization of these activities in the united states rather than exporting our d
, calling it a violation of u.n. security council resolutions. and china, north korea's long-time ally, also expressed regret launch calling on the state to abide by u.n. resolutions. now u.n. security council diplomats have also set up an emergency meeting today at the request of the u.s. and japan. back to you. >> all right. thanks for that. >>> the senior fellow at the school of international studies at the technological university. thanks for joining us. what does this test do today? what's the impact on regional securit security? >> short term, i don't think the impact is going to be particularly severe. in some ways it's been priced in. and for once, north korea's rocket actually did what it was supposed to do which is fly south and not pass over any territory. so in that sense, the reaction can be contained. on the other hand, it caught people by surprise. and i think there will be questions ask the about how could the intelligence -- how good the intelligence was in the u.s. and south korea in failing to pick this up. >> how significant is it that this launch appears to be successful
markets around the world were closed for christmas, and for the day after christm christmas. china, five-month high on the notion that the urbanization plan will gain spurs in the housing stocks there. japan, abe confirmed as prime minister there. the seventh prime minister in the past six years. we did see the yen hit a 20-month low against the u.s. dollar. notable lows against the euro as well. the topics in the nikkai the lowest in nine months. >> going back to his old job, that he had back in 2007. strange in and of itself. i wonder how long it will take for people to start talking about netflix after the outage going into christmas eve on social media. they were calling it no flix. and to blame amazon web services, which is one of their huge growth engines. a unit of the company they say is probably a tenth of its eventual size. >> one of the highest growth parts of amazon right now, the web services portion. their amazon is down 1.25%. i don't know if that's the reason. but it was the streaming center in northern virginia that was the source of the netflix outage. it's resolved, th
and where is china all of this? >> so there are several different pieces. one of them going back to the economy, we used to have much higher practices than we do now. how were we able to have full employment on that? we did not have the system of the budget deficits what makes it so much harder and just to sort of duty had enough, it is the persistence of trade deficit least not have one and now we do and that is a big drag on the economy. which hasn't been better actually the trade deficit is actually significantly down but not all. we have had some that have become more competitive that is the front on which we need to work. the political debate hasn't kept up with the reality it's no longer the quarter of that anymore. it's the broadest of countries some that need to be worked on and the next president isn't just china bashing but what do we need to do have a world that is everybody trying to run a trade surplus which the government believes it is possible. [laughter] >> then there is this issue of trade and income inequality. and there's a similar level that presumably had re
deficit to china being $29.8 billion per month. that is just one country. you start to add up all the trade deficit that we have with all of these different trading partners over the years, i am sure that it is close to about $1 trillion per year. >> thank you for the comments. let's go to sarasota next. caller: good afternoon. the way that i look at it, as a 74-year-old professional pharmacist with a minor in economics, the reason i am independent is because republicans and democrats cannot seem to get it together. the biggest problem that we have now is the reason why we cannot do what we are supposed to do for the entire country. one middleman adnan grover norquist. someone who was never even elected. here is a man that has caused all the problems. all of the republicans have signed this pledge, which to me is unconstitutional. without him, we would not be talking today. >> salem, oregon, republican line. you are on the air. caller: good morning. as a college student, and i have listened to every single caller, this is an embarrassing day for our country. i am a first-time job
by "the detroit news." he's told chrysler to italians were going to make jeeps in china. romney will fight for every american jobs. >> ibm @ rahm and i approve this message. host: that ad was quickly refuted by the obama campaign. this ad became a real distraction to the campaign in the following weeks. they will say if you looked at where the results were in ohio, where they lost was not in the automobile district but elsewhere. it created a stink over the romney campaign in the final days that hurt him everywhere. to us, this ad captures something important. it is their uneasiness about talking about issues that are not helpful for them earlier on but they had to be talked about. this saw the automobile issue was playing on obama's turf. they were talking about it so it was an issue out there. when you don't talk about it and don't explain it, that's a problem. there was a notion run the campaign, if you are explaining, you are a loser. the problem was by not explaining or even addressing, they let themselves be defined. they realize this late in the game. there was huge pressure from el
pods losing market share. iphones just not doing that well in china. there it is. back in the green. let's take a look at the major market averages. the dow jones industrial average is up. the nasdaq is also in the green, as well as, the s&p 500. daaen: thank you. connell: dan had injured reporting that he will be leaving his post next month. >> the opportunity presented itself. this was the moment to either take this job or not. i think he felt with the senate transitioning into a new year this was the moment to make the move. he took it. connell: it would have been a six year term. this is early. >> it is a reflection of the frustration. i think it probably would have won the election, maybe this would not have happened. now, with what we have seen, with the fiscal cliff, it is virtually impossible. i think that senator demint can do more running the heritage foundation the way she would like to rather than sitting in the senate. dagen: does this also speak to him resigning from the senate, the power of the tea party, perhaps? >> i do not know it is the waning power of the tea party. i
as china with the issue of human rights. as long as the international community does not address the interests of the importance stakeholders, that is not really going to help. what is your take on that? >> i think they have very short form policy. i have been in moscow and we met with the russian minister of foreign affairs. syria and russia have a relationship. we need to keep such a relationship, but with such short policies by defending the assad regime, you of making such a relationship very difficult. i think the syrians see russia the same as they see the assad regime. when you see your brother and sister being killed every day -- i have been in syria and i have lots of examples. when the syrian people solve all of this happen for them, of course, they will change their position on russia. i think for russia to keep their ambassador, it is difficult to keep him in damascus. any government in the future, they will put their relationship with russia and iran as a priority. there are many voices within the opposition, and the syrian government should be open to negotiations a
it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're going to have to pay back. $30,000 for every man, woman and child. that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> so, unpatriotic. >> the hypocrite in chief says in 2008 that 5 from is unpatriotic but now we're up to $16.4 trillion. that's okay. by the way we move my credit card limits. he doesn't want a debt ceiling going forward. >> debt ceiling no more can congress deal when the president says we're going to raise the debt ceiling. no squabbles back and forth. >> let me get this straight. borrow $4.8 billion a day and now we're coming to the edge ever the fiscal cliff. republicans are saying hey, let's continue the bush tax cuts, let's make this fair for everyone but let's stop spending. we are spending more than we have. democrats are saying now they are saying it doesn't matter, we are not focused on the deficit any
with this, the british, the french, the germans, russia, china, they all tend to view this as a proliferation problem. the conversation between iran and the other side tends to be about that issue, very narrowly focused. to kind of move that conversation, you have to figure out a different kind of architecture. the five plus one process, as such, is designed to deal with the corporation issue and the composition is that has to do with the iranian violation of the mpt and there have been 62 -- six security council resolutions that suggests sanctions. there are two countries who suggest that the issue between -- that this is not a proliferation issue but has to do with the character of the regime and one of them is israel who does not view this as strictly an arms dispute and the second one is iran who similarly suggests that although it is an arms control issue, they are really using arms control as a way to undermine the regime. there are two actors in this particular conflagration who are not accepting the argument being that this is about nuclear infractions as oppo
but also offer a great opportunity. you see, what i find in africa today is that china has an increasing presence on that continent. china has a plan when it comes to the future of africa. america does not. that's why i'm going to offer as an amendment to the tag bill, which is currently pending before the senate, the american jobs through greater exports to africa act. my partners on the bill are senator chris coons, senator ben cardin, john boozman and mary landrieu, as well as support in the house from representative chris smith. at the heart of this bill is the creation of jobs in america. exporting more goods to africa will help create jobs here. every $1 billion in exports supports over 5,000 jobs. i believe we can increase exports from the united states to africa by 200% in real dollars over the next ten years, and we can't wait any longer. if there are some who say africa is so backward and so far behind, what is it in the united states they can afford to buy if they even wanted to, that is old thinking. let me give you some new reality. in the past ten years six of the world's f
. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the country. therefore i don't think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giants tax breaks then give it to those who want to invest in the country, who want to create jobs here, not overcease, and they think try to think of ways to get their money over there into here lower than say the american businessman paying 35%. guest: i mean, i understand your frustration. i think part of it is th
year old yuee y ao who was visiting her new grandchild from china. the judge sat at unisys bail at $2 million. if she posted she must wear a scram device to make sure she does not drink and she is not allowed to drive. she will be back for our arraignment on december 31st. approval ratings for president obama and his cabinet i mixed. a new poll shows 52 percent of people surveyed approve of the president's performance while 43 percent disapprove. vice-president joe biden number is wet and art but in line with the president. 54 percent approved is the performance of 40 percent do not. presley michelle about has a 73 percent approval rating. >> and delta also the majority of americans support stricter gun laws but mostly against banning assault weapons. 58 percent of americans now say they support stricter gun laws and that is up from 43% in october 2011. the american public is split on enforcing existing gun laws instead of passing new ones 46% of the public wants and forced her loss of 47 once new legislation. education officials and officials at santa cruz city schools are expected t
or machete does the same. look at china. look at what they are doing to school kids in china today with aged weapons do. we register those? >> although the lethality is different there. >> how many were killed most recently in china? >> 27 were stabbed and they all survived. none died. >> they have other lethal ones as well. >> there were several multiple killings with -- >> we'll return to this topic tomorrow and talk about regulation. but i would love to have you both back at the table and you guys as well. ta-nehesi coates, richard lucibella, haley elkins and jackie hilly. thank you. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urin
drew the wrath of china's news agency for promising to label them a currency manipulator. unfortunately for the mad men, it wasn't just the chinese who were paying attention. a general motors spokesman accused them of entering into a parallel universe with that ad saying jeep was shipping american jobs over to china. >>> finally, a toddler takes in cnbc's fiscal cliff talk. >> i think companies might be okay with that -- [ laughing ] >> that's like young kids who say they like me saying "let's play hardball." anyway, that's going viral, obviously. >>> up next, 44% of a certain group of americans tell pollsters seceding from the union might be a good idea. who are these people? half think aa.c.o.r.n., which no longer exists, stole the election. what is this fringe called? it's called the gop. wait until you see these stats. it's like jay walking with jay leno. i don't know who these people are. anyway, "hardball," the place for politics, coming up. okay, now here's our holiday gift list. aww, not the mall. well, i'll do the shopping... if you do the shipping. shipping's a hassle. i'll go
. >>> in china the longest high speed railway opens, connects beijing with guangzhou, 1,500 in eight hours, but tickets start at $138, and they're a little pricey for some people and many travelers say it's cheaper and faster to fly. >>> a report just out this morning shows home prices up in october, the biggest annual gain in more than two years. alison kosik joins us from the new york stock exchange. tell us more. >> this is a bigger gain than analysts were expecting. home prices in 20 of the biggest cities in the u.s. went up by 4.3% in october compared to october of last year and as you said it is the biggest increase in more than two years. prices also they've gone up for five months in a row so that's more good news as well as far as the momentum goes. this jives with a lot of the other housing reports that have come in on the positive side talking about home sales, home building, builder confidence, all of those are showing this upward momentum, so yeah, housing is definitely in recovery mode, and it's really helping to boost the entire economy. in fact we saw that with third quarte
taken offline. >>> video from shanghai china shows a giant shark tank at a shopping mall -- wow -- suddenly shatters spectators swept away as the water spills out. 16 people were hurt there, some were cut by the flying glass. three sharks were killed in the incident. it's believed that glass fell apart because it was too old. >> yikes. >> unbelievable. >> they're going to have to go back and get a new hot pretzel. >> how do you get sharks in a mall? okay. >> i can't answer that question. i hope someone can. >> get into >>> the widow of slain army ranger pat tillman is speaking out in a rare interview. marie tillman tells jeff glor about the private side of her late husband that we never knew and her surprising second chance at love. you're watching "cbs this morning." love. you're watching "cbs this morning." [ sniffs ] i have a cold. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ br
from the ship to power in the united states and the west, to china and east. the powers of globalization in the digital era, how to do with the 1.6 billion muslims in the world, threats of iranian nuclear power. and i also look at internal threats. low birthrates, a simulation and again whether we can in effect succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever being integrated in our society. it's a new phenomenon and that's really what i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli is. i've been to israel maybe 40 times. three times this year alone during the carter and clinton administrations is deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i'll say right from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years in time in israel. so it's a unique give looking from the outside in and the inside out. >> israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see many some night. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it's a r
of tragedies. >> there was also a similar incidence in china of someone going in but they didn't have a gun so nobody died. it happened on the exact same day. >> stephanie: if we all go to our regular talking points, we're never going to get anything done. all of those catchphrases, guns don't kill people, all of that stuff, there is something we can do. and i honestly feel like everything's a part of it. mental health, cutbacks that affect mental health. obviously guns. senator feinstein's bill should be the start of what we do. absolutely we should ban assault weapons and the clips and close the loophole at gun shows. >> a woman was calling said her granddaughter's school has bulletproof glass and metal doors. you can't get in. >> stephanie: louis gohmert on cue, we need teachers armed. we need more guns. >> we need 6-year-olds armed. >> stephanie: seriously first grade principals, we need them armed like rambo? >> you know what? i would rather have them be trained to teach children. i don't need them to be trai
that before in china, another mentally disturbed man went into a school and knifed 23 people, 22 of them children. i think one has died. the difference was, he had a knife. adam lanza had a gun. >> the united states, for better or for worse, is a gun culture. we are a culture that uniquely in the world sees the value and significance and firearms. it is been the case since the founding of the republic. the second amendment is scorned by many people, but it has been there since the beginning and it is very meaningful to millions and millions of people in this country. farmers represent not something evil to many americans -- firearms represent not something evil to many americans, the self-reliance. the american profile. as a result, we end up with a country that is suffused with firearms. >> and "meet the press," the author of the 1994 salt weapons and i and feinstein said she is introducing a bill to reform gun ownership standards in the next congress. >> i'm going to introduce in the senate and the same bill be introduced in the house, a bill to ban assault weapons. it will ban the sal
the arrival of 2013. for many it's already the new year. this is a live look at hong kong china. the clock struck midnight. coming up, how people here are getting ready for the new year. >> time is up to avert the fiscal cliff. the last minute scrambling at this house going on behind closed doors. >> and the redskins pull it off. they knock off the cowboys. >> welcome to news 4 midday. >> it's new year's eve, monday, december 31, 2012. >> it's down to the wire. we are less than 24 hours away from hitting the so-called fiscal a cliff right now. the house and senate are striking a deal oh avoid massive tax hikes and spending cuts. derek ward is live with more on what's happening today. >> the end is near. that's the end of the year, of course. what about the path that ends at the end of the fiscal cliff. senators should be back at it. the house reconvened this morning. such new year's eve appearances are on the hill. senate minority leader mitch mcconnell and joe biden kept in place to avoid $200 billion in tax increases. broad stroke spending cuts and domestic and defense spending. they wou
with that ad saying jeep was shipping american jobs to china. >>> finally a toddler takes in cnbc's fiscal cliff talk. >> that's like young kids who say they like me saying let's play "hardball." that's going viral obviously. >>> up next, 44% of a certain group of americans tell pollsters seceding from the union might be a good idea. who are these people in half the republicans think a.c.o.r.n. which no longer exists stole the election. wait until you see these stats. it's like jay walking with jay le leno. i don't know who these people are. anyway, "hardball," the place for politics, coming up. maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. customer erin swenson bought so, i'm happy. today. sales go up... i'm happy. it went out today... i'm happy. what if she's not home? (together) she won't be happy. use ups! she can get a text alert, reroute... even re
and latin america. the company has big expansion plans in china. there are currently more than 18,000 starbuck's around the globe. they're now charging $7 for the snazzy cup of coffee. so, of course, they can expand. >> some kind of premium blend, exotic blend. >> flecks of gold in it. >> should for $7 a cup. your thursday forecast, everybody. we have showers from portland to seattle. up to 8 inches of snow in the cascades and northern rockies. still mild in the nation's midsection. pop-up showers around omaha, nebraska and louisville. scattered showers from the carolina coast through florida. >> 70s from dallas to miami. mostly 40s in the northwest. 77 in phoenix. 37 in billings. >>> 'tis the season for some really funny movies, funny flicks. we want your help to pick the best, "world news now" classic christmas competition. say that five times fast. >> that is a mouthful. >> so get this, logon to our website at wnnfans.com. and vote. we both look borderline. >> i look cross-eyed. you look constipated. >> too many candy canes. vote early and often. on our facebook page. let us kn
was union and we were making $16 an hour. it went overseas. the company would prefer to go to china and a somebody $2 a day or whatever. these right-to-work states are full of temporary jobs agencies with contracts. the stamp services -- these temporary services are making money and paying people a fraction. we need to let politicians go to a temporary service and give them half of what they are making and make them see how we feel. people working for small amounts of money at temp services. ynette.ow to panetta, conwalive caller: they call it a right-to- work states, but i guess the language got changed, because it used to be a free will state. the employers without unions had the right to fire you for anything, any reason or no reason at all, and you had no recourse. so i still believe in unions and i still believe the people should have a right to join or not. host: this tweet -- are you with us? caller: i am. host: higher wages of less jobs in the state's. caller: yes, but most of the jobs in this area, in the myrtle beach area, those are minimum- wage jobs, where i live. if we
short-term debt, not long-term debt because of huge interest rate disc over time. if you look at china in particular, they are now looking at corporate bonds and alternative investments within u.s. treasury securities because they don't like what they see and understandably so. so we are living on borrowed time. we've created another bubble in my view is the reason the fed is doing a kissimmee and it was changed to where they have to be concerned with short-term employment. in the absence of the deck unsustainable over time. >> the most successful fiscal consolidations in the developed democratic world occurred in canada in the mid-1990s. i frankly asked canadian politicians, how did she do it? because the public wind from cheering on spending two and a set deficits within a matter of a year or two so that governments in canada now with some peril if they don't balance the budget. the answer you most frequently to do so they have to do was say that 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill and the canadian debt. the public immediately realized i was not a great idea and became
and terrifying video out of shanghai, china. 33-ton shark tank exploded sending sharks flying everywhere and shoppers running for their lives. at least four people were in front of the tank when it cracked as you saw there. 16 people suffered cuts and bruises, nobody was seriously hurt. three lemon sharks died. officials are investigating whether cold temperatures along with shoddy design may have caused this. >> i'm not sure this gives you the story you want. i got bit by a shark in front of the gap. >> shanghai known for its rigorous building standards. >> i love shanghai but this is always the criticism. is everything built right because it looks good. >> fabulous city but a little shoddy in some of the standards. >> that's a weird story. >> i've never heard of that happening. >> never before. we cover a lot of crazy stories. >>> one of the crazy stories we cover on cnn is the fiscal cliff. we'll wait to see if a critical meeting at the white house will prevent us from falling over the fiscal cliff. congressional leaders meet with president obama and vice president biden if hopes of c
opened three weeks ago in india. and in china, it's going to be the second biggest market for starbucks by 2014. they're going to have 1,500 stores in 70 cities in china in the next three years. >> and let's be clear about the fiscal cliff. i mean, the near-term impact is bad, right? a lot of people think it would be a recession, but lasting long-term impact, it would lower deficits, you know, and would cut into -- so -- >> dramatically. >> so this isn't the way to go about it. you want to scalp a hatchet, as i keep saying. but companies are trying to make long-term plans, even though near term they're very concerned about what's going on. >>> apple stock dropped more than 6% yesterday. watch that? shares down a little bit in premarket trading this morning. there are a few factors that traders suspect drove the selling. today there's another hearing in the patent case with samsung in california and a research report generated buzz that apple's tablet competitors could eat into its market share. apple shares were up 33% so far this year, right? so if somebody's taking some profits, they'
with nerve gas. that's not a good place for even russia and china to be at the end of the day, jon. jon: want to turn your attention to pearl harbor day, general. it is, it is upon us again. i just wanted to get your thoughts on this day. >> you know, in a way we can look at pearl harbor as a sort of cautionary tale, jon. over the last 70 or 80 years, this nation has almost always been surprised by our enemies, whether it's nerve, pearl harbor and the other various -- korea, all the various wars we've gone to. and as a nation what's important here is to prevent wars by being prepared for wars. and not to try to pick any particular region of the world to anticipate when, where, how and why a conflict will be started. we're not very good at that as a nation, jon. jon: let's hope we can learn. general bob scales, good to have you on. >> thank you, jon. heather: we are getting a new snapshot of the health of the economy right now. according to the labor department, unemployment fell to 7.7% in november after adding 146,000 jobs last month. but the dip in the jobless rate due mostly to the fact th
it matters, and it does. [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to "squawk box," everybody. in our headlines we're about an hour away from the november jobs report and the numbers are expected to be impacted by sandy. the dow jones forecast is calling for new 80,000 nonfarm jobs. >>> the reuters forecast is calling for 93,000 new jobs. >>> ibm is implementing a significant change to its benefit program. starting next year matching contributions to employees' 401(k) accounts will be given in one lump sum on december 31st. if a worker leaves the company before december 15th, they won't get anything from that
, china and india in particular are actually the source of most of the increasing greenhouse fasts that we've seen in recent years and the united states is at a level of greenhouse gas emissions it hasn't been at in over a decade. so, partially due to our own repressed economy, but partialingly due to the fact that you're talking about regulations and alternative fuels, the u.s. economy and other industriallized economies have actually seen their emissions stabilize or even fall over the past decade. >> yeah, and china, they're a big polluter. i mean, if you go into a store and you break something, you pay for it. so, if we can prove that a country is a big polluter, why shouldn't they pay? >> the problem is that even if the united states, all the other stilllized countries complied with what the secretary-general was talking about, it actually wouldn't do anything in terms of greenhouse gas emissions because the growth in the greenhouse gas emissions is coming with the developing world and it would be almost symbolic gesture in terms of global warming which is their theory and do nothing
he came from, back to china, but his home country, our good old buddies, the chinese, refused to take him back. they didn't want him, and so they stalled and stalled and stalled, and over those three years of chinese stalling and gave him the run-around, chen was eventually free and free to kill and kill he did. mr. speaker, this tragedy is not an isolated phenomena. flafflet, other americans have died as a result -- unfortunately, other americans have died as a result of a gaping hole in the immigration system. it's no secret that everybody believes our immigration system is broken. fixing it down the road will be complex and complicated, but there's some things we can do about immigration right now to fix specific problems and here's one of these. currently, mr. speaker, thousands of criminal aliens are in our country, just like chen, that have committed a crime, gone to prison, our immigration worked to order them deported but their country won't take them back. they refuse to do so, so those countries stall and delay and eventually never take back their outlaws. so by law when the
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